An Inclusive Innovation Monitor for Canada: A discussion paper
In partnership, the Brookfield Institute and the Innovation Policy Lab introduce, articulate the need for, and conceptualize a new way to monitor innovation and inclusion (or inclusive innovation) in Canada—and shed light on how the country is performing
A Message from our Executive Director, Sean Mullin
During this uncertain time, we are grateful to the medical professionals, grocery store clerks, and countless essential services that are keeping us healthy and safe. Our goal is to bring the Canadian policy community together to highlight the best economic and social policy ideas to keep us afloat and connected.
First, send money. Stimulus in a global pandemic needs a new playbook.
What kind of stimulus package should the federal government provide to deal with the unprecedented COVID-19 emergency? BII+E's Sean Mullin and RLL's Karim Bardeesy weigh in. This article was originally published by the Toronto Star.

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t the Brookfield Institute for Innovation + Entrepreneurship (BII+E), we’re motivated by the potential of the innovation economy. We believe Canada can build prosperity that will be more widely shared than ever before. To achieve this future, Canada will need forward-looking insights and new thinking to advance actionable innovation policy.

 

Our multi-disciplinary teams focus on work streams which we believe are critical to Canada’s future economic success. They build collaborative relationships with our partners to generate rigorous research, propose unconventional approaches and pilot ideas to explore how Canada’s innovation economy can include people of different ages, incomes and backgrounds.

As part of the Women Entrepreneurship Knowledge Hub (WEKH), we are exploring various facets of women entrepreneurship. This project seeks to understand the experiences of women entrepreneurs related to high-growth scale-ups.
How is personal data currently being generated, collected, and used in Canada? This project will serve as a foundation for a more informed discussion about data ownership, data sharing, privacy and trust in Canada. The findings will allow policymakers to better understand the public appetite for policies being considered.
Science fiction can be a window into the future, offering us entire galaxies of possibility models, as well as alternate pasts and worlds that exist entirely unconnected to our own timeline. In this series, we interview leading science fiction writers about socio-economic worldbuilding, and what the future of work and the economy could look like.
This work stream examines the distribution of risks and benefits in Canada's innovation economy and explores how to improve equity and broaden participation.
Five things we learned about how we might better empower women entrepreneurs
How might we better empower women entrepreneurs? This blog explores what we’ve learned through our co-designed call for proposals. It offers insights into what it takes to enable the inclusion of diverse entrepreneurs in the economy by drawing on learnings from the three projects funded through our Empowering Women Entrepreneurs initiative.
Into the Dataverse: A snapshot of how personal data is generated, collected, and used in Canada
How is personal data currently being generated, collected, and used in Canada? This project will serve as a foundation for a more informed discussion about data ownership, data sharing, privacy and trust in Canada. The findings will allow policymakers to better understand the public appetite for policies being considered.