Jessica Thornton

Collaborator

Jessica is a collaborator at BII+E who uses creative problem solving around human-centred design, strategic foresight, and design research methods to advance innovation policy. Formerly at BII+E, she was responsible for leading several major projects, including Employment in 2030 and Digitally Lit. Previously, Jessica led user research as part of the Impact of Tech on Ontario’s Workforce Project, as well as BII+E’s engagement in various education related projects such as Basecamp, SHAD at Ryerson, ZerotoStartup, and YRDSB Climate Hack2Action.

Before BII+E, Jessica spent nearly a decade in the not-for-profit sector, in a range of roles, tackling issues such as housing affordability, transportation accessibility, and sustainable food system development.

Jessica holds an Honours BA in Anthropology and Equity Studies from the University of Toronto, a certificate in food security from Ryerson University, and a diploma in Fundraising and Volunteer Management from George Brown College. Jessica recently completed a Master of Design in Strategic Foresight and Innovation at OCAD University, exploring the futures of public engagement.

20 Contributions

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Aug 19, 2019

A look at how a range of experts across Canada are thinking about the future of employment, as well as which trends they believe are most likely to create change
Signs of the Times: Expert insights about employment in 2030

Aug 19, 2019

Aperçu des réflexions d’experts de partout au Canada sur l’avenir de l’emploi, ainsi que sur les tendances qui, à leur avis, sont les plus susceptibles de créer le changement
Signes des temps: Perspectives et réflexions d’experts sur l’emploi en 2030

Apr 9, 2019

What does the future hold for employment in Canada? Using strategic foresight research methods, this report explores a broad range of trends with the potential to impact Canada's labour market.
Turn and Face the Strange: Changes impacting the future of employment in Canada

Apr 9, 2019

Since we’re not (yet) able to predict the future, find out how we used strategic foresight research methods to explore employment in Canada over the next 10–15 years.
Strange ideas about the future of employment
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