Rebooting Regulation: Exploring the Future of AI Policy in Canada

Insight into the cross-country series of labs we designed and delivered in partnership with CIFAR to explore the public policy implications of artificial intelligence (AI)
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Rebooting Regulation: Exploring the Future of AI Policy in Canada

Illustration by: Karen Birkemoe

​Sarah Villeneuve
Policy Analyst
Brent Barron
Director, Public Policy, CIFAR
Gaga Boskovic
Public Policy Associate, CIFAR

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About this report

The Brookfield Institute for Innovation + Entrepreneurship (BII+E) and CIFAR teamed up to design and deliver a cross-country series of AI Futures Policy Labs, with stops in Toronto, Edmonton, Vancouver, Ottawa, and Montreal. This series brought together over 125 policymakers from the public, private, academic, and not-for-profit sectors across Canada with the aim of increasing their understanding of existing and potential AI capabilities and applications and facilitating early thinking about appropriate policy responses.

Throughout the labs, participants were tasked with developing policy recommendations based on what they learned and what was discussed, including the policy implications of AI. Once each of the five labs were complete, we aggregated and analyzed these recommendations to identify trends. We were able to group recommendations into eight distinct categories:

  • Future of work
  • AI antitrust
  • Consumer protection
  • Data governance
  • Public education
  • Public consultation
  • Encouraging responsible innovation
  • AI regulation and legislation
Read this report to help you:
  • Gain insight into current discussions regarding AI policy across Canada
  • Learn about participant-generated AI policy recommendations related to topics such as  data governance, consumer protection, and public education.

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Key Findings:

  • Using real-world case studies helped to ground abstract concepts of AI in everyday life.
  • There is high demand for more engagements connecting civil servants with technical experts on emerging technologies. While in-person labs are one option, we identified alternative delivery options for future efforts, including open source tools and online education.
  • Continuous iteration based off participant feedback helped us to better serve the knowledge gaps of incoming participants.
  • Using an expansive definition of policymakers allowed for multi-sectoral engagement and contribution from a range of diverse perspectives. Participants often cited this as a valuable part of the workshop experience.
​Sarah Villeneuve
Policy Analyst
Brent Barron
Director, Public Policy, CIFAR
Gaga Boskovic
Public Policy Associate, CIFAR

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