BII+E Talks: Myth of Capitalism

We enjoyed a morning with researcher and author Denise Hearn, co-author of The Myth of Capitalism: Monopolies and the Death of Capitalism
BII+E Talks: Myth of Capitalism

Date

January 21, 2019 from 8:30am - 10:00 am

Location

Ryerson Student Learning Centre (SLC) DMZ Sandbox
341 Yonge Street, Suite 312 Toronto, Ontario M5B 1S1
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The Brookfield Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship presented a morning with researcher and author Denise Hearn. Hearn is the co-author of The Myth of Capitalism: Monopolies and the Death of Competition, which tells the story of how North America has gone from an open, competitive marketplace to an economy where a few very powerful companies dominate key industries that affect our daily lives. It tackles the big questions of: why is society becoming more unequal, why is economic growth anemic despite trillions of dollars of federal debt and money printing, why have the number of startups declined, and why are workers losing out?

Hearn shared some key insights from the book which was followed by Q&A led by Nisa Malli, Senior Policy Analyst at the Brookfield Institute.

8:30 am: Coffee + networking
9:00–10:00 am: Talk + Q&A

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About Denise Hearn

Denise Hearn writes, presents, and consults on economic justice and human flourishing. She is co-author of The Myth of Capitalism: Monopolies and the Death of Competition – named one of the Financial Times’ Best Books of 2018 and endorsed by two Nobel Prize winners. Denise has presented to over 50,000 people at venues including: the Oxford Union, Bloomberg, a Canadian Parliamentary Standing Committee, and group homes for foster children.

Most recently, Denise was Head of Business Development at Variant Perception – a global macroeconomic research and investment strategy firm that caters to hedge funds and family offices. She has also built new impact investment models in Canada, helped create the world’s first Trustmark for Sharing Economy companies in the UK, and was chosen to participate in the Alt/Now: Economic Inequality residency program at the Banff Centre.

Denise has an MBA from the Oxford Saïd Business School, where she co-chaired the Social Impact Oxford Business Network, and a BA in International Studies from Baylor University.

About The Myth of Capitalism

The Myth of Capitalism tells the story of how America has gone from an open, competitive marketplace to an economy where a few very powerful companies dominate key industries that affect our daily lives. Digital monopolies like Google, Facebook and Amazon act as gatekeepers to the digital world. Amazon is capturing almost all online shopping dollars. We have the illusion of choice, but for most critical decisions, we have only one or two companies, when it comes to high speed Internet, health insurance, medical care, mortgage title insurance, social networks, Internet searches, or even consumer goods like toothpaste. Every day, the average American transfers a little of their pay check to monopolists and oligopolists. The solution is vigorous anti-trust enforcement to return America to a period where competition created higher economic growth, more jobs, higher wages and a level playing field for all. The Myth of Capitalism is the story of industrial concentration, but it matters to everyone, because the stakes could not be higher.

Capitalism is the greatest economic system in history. It has lifted people from poverty and created widespread wealth for billions of people. Unfortunately, the so-called capitalism that exists today in the United States and Canada is the antithesis of a competitive marketplace. Monopolies and oligopolies dominate the economy, with a few winners and millions of losers. The Myth of Capitalism explains how we got to this state and clearly points the way back to open markets that work for everyone.

Date

January 21, 2019 from 8:30am - 10:00 am

Location

Ryerson Student Learning Centre (SLC) DMZ Sandbox
341 Yonge Street, Suite 312 Toronto, Ontario M5B 1S1
Print

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