Employment in 2030: Action Labs

This project aims to translate our Employment in 2030 research into practical solutions that help workers across Canada gain the skills and abilities critical for the future of work

Project Team

Heather Russek
Collaborator, Innovation Design + Futures
Jessica Thornton
Collaborator
Michelle Park
Project Manager
Darren Elias
Communications Intern
Diana Rivera
Senior Economist
Erin Warner
Marketing and Communications Specialist

Why we’re doing this project

From a rapid shift to remote work, changing global powers, and responses to the climate emergency, Canada’s economy is evolving rapidly as a result of major technological, social, environmental, and political changes. COVID-19 has, in many cases, disrupted or accelerated these changes. These shifts inevitably alter the nature of work — introducing new threats and uncertainties, but also introducing new opportunities.

BII+E’s Employment in 2030 initiative focused on responding to these changes to create a holistic, detailed, and actionable forecast of in-demand skills. The Forecast of Canadian Occupational Growth (FCOG) was released earlier this year along with a web app and the data and modelling code that we used to build it. The forecast identified a number of foundational skills and abilities that are projected to enable workers to remain resilient to labour market change over the next decade. These include: fluency of ideas, memorization, instructing, persuasion, and service orientation.

The aim of Employment in 2030: Lights, Camera, Action! is to build on the FCOG by supporting the design of policies and programs that help workers gain the skills and abilities they need to be resilient in the next decade. With this project, we plan to:

  • Explore how COVID-19 might impact the trends, foundational skills, and abilities that were identified in the Forecast of Canadian Occupational Growth (FCOG)
  • Apply the Forecast of Canadian Occupational Growth (FCOG) to policy and program design
  • Co-create regionally relevant interventions and / or solutions to help more organizations and people build the skills that will be critical for the future of work
  • Gather feedback from workshop participants to inform potential future iterations of the FCOG

This project is part of the portfolio of work by the Future Skills Centre, which is funded by the Government of Canada’s Future Skills Program in partnership of Ryerson University, the Conference Board of Canada, and Blueprint.

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Our Approach

This project will translate the Forecast of Canadian Occupational Growth (FCOG) into action, helping to ensure the Canadian workforce is equipped with the most critical foundational skills and abilities for 2030. We will use a combination of futures research, prototyping, and creative, interactive workshops to drive our solutions-oriented project. 

Over the course of 11 months, this project will involve a series of activities:

  • Futures research: COVID-19 has created a range of labour market disruptions while influencing, and in some cases, accelerating existing trends. We’re updating Turn and Face the Strange to identify how COVID-19 and other emerging trends may impact the future of Canada’s labour market in 2030. 
  • National expert panel: The Forecast of Canadian Occupational Growth (FCOG) identified five foundational skills and abilities that align with occupations projected to grow in employment share by 2030. We will engage experts across Canada to discuss how COVID-19 and other emerging trends may impact this forecast and the implications for skills demand in 2030. 
  • Regional prototyping workshops: The FCOG, alongside other forecasts, as well as the updated Turn and Face the Strange will be the basis of virtual prototyping workshops held with six regional partners across Canada. These workshops will engage participants in identifying potential service offerings or interventions to help workers gain the skills and abilities they need to be resilient in the next decade. The prototyping workshops will be carefully designed to guide participants—from different sectors and backgrounds, with diverse perspectives—through a structured, impact-oriented process, leading to rich, multifaceted discussions and the creation of robust prototypes. 
  • Prototype refinement + collaboration: Prototypes created during the regionally based workshops will be refined and shared at a national level with stakeholders across the country. Participants will test their assumptions, refine their ideas, and identify the critical next steps needed to enable their solutions.
  • Research reports: We will document our process as we go, sharing key insights along the way in the form of reports, blogs, and more.

If you would like to get involved with this project, as a regional partner, advisor, or workshop participant, please get in touch with Michelle Park at michellepark@ryerson.ca. 

Our Sponsors

This project is funded by the Government of Canada’s Future Skills Centre, a pan-Canadian initiative, connecting ideas and innovations generated across Canada so that employees and employers can succeed in the labour market, and to ensure that local, regional, and national economies thrive. Funded by the Government of Canada’s Future Skills Program, the Future Skills Centre is a partnership of Ryerson University, the Conference Board of Canada, and Blueprint.

Heather Russek
Collaborator, Innovation Design + Futures
Jessica Thornton
Collaborator
Michelle Park
Project Manager
Darren Elias
Communications Intern
Diana Rivera
Senior Economist
Erin Warner
Marketing and Communications Specialist

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