The Policymaker’s Guide to the Galaxy: What science fiction can teach us about the future of work
Science fiction can be a window into the future, offering us entire galaxies of possibility models, as well as alternate pasts and worlds that exist entirely unconnected to our own timeline. In this series, we interview leading science fiction writers about socio-economic worldbuilding, and what the future of work and the economy could look like.
Who are Canada’s Tech Workers?
Looking at the many faces behind Canada’s tech occupations, with a focus on who are Canada’s tech workers? Where do they work? And what do they earn?
Five things we learned about how we might better empower women entrepreneurs
How might we better empower women entrepreneurs? This blog explores what we’ve learned through our co-designed call for proposals. It offers insights into what it takes to enable the inclusion of diverse entrepreneurs in the economy by drawing on learnings from the three projects funded through our Empowering Women Entrepreneurs initiative.

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t the Brookfield Institute for Innovation + Entrepreneurship (BII+E), we’re motivated by the potential of the innovation economy. We believe Canada can build prosperity that will be more widely shared than ever before. To achieve this future, Canada will need forward-looking insights and new thinking to advance actionable innovation policy.

 

Our multi-disciplinary teams focus on work streams which we believe are critical to Canada’s future economic success. They build collaborative relationships with our partners to generate rigorous research, propose unconventional approaches and pilot ideas to explore how Canada’s innovation economy can include people of different ages, incomes and backgrounds.

Science fiction can be a window into the future, offering us entire galaxies of possibility models, as well as alternate pasts and worlds that exist entirely unconnected to our own timeline. In this series, we interview leading science fiction writers about socio-economic worldbuilding, and what the future of work and the economy could look like.
In collaboration with MaRS Data Catalyst and the Labour Market Information Council, and with support from JPMorgan Chase & Co, this project aims to develop a model for better understanding job transitions, so that workers with valuable skills can find new roles at companies that need them.
Despite its strong reputation in AI research, Canada’s ability to translate AI’s promise into economic impact at home continues to lag. This project seeks to uncover how Canadian firms identify, acquire, and access talent needed to successfully adopt AI.
This work stream seeks to understand future skill demands across Canada, while helping companies and people gain the skills they need to thrive in an innovation-driven economy.
Levelling Up: The quest for digital literacy
This report maps the digital literacy education and training landscape in Canada. It highlights the types of digital skills that people in Canada are pursuing, sheds light on barriers to access, and identifies existing gaps and potential opportunities to improve the development and supply of digital literacy skills.
Turn and Face the Strange: Changes impacting the future of employment in Canada
A look at the complex trends impacting the future of employment in Canada–and how these trends interact in not-so-obvious ways. While not a prediction tool or a deep analysis of any one trend, this report is designed to spark exploratory and imaginative thinking. It pushes leaders from all sectors to think beyond what they currently know about the future of work, to consider other possibilities.